About the Sacrament of Confirmation

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church #1316-1321 

Confirmation perfects Baptismal grace; it is the sacrament which gives the Holy Spirit in order to root us more deeply in the divine filiation, incorporate us more firmly into Christ, strengthen our bond with the Church, associate us more closely with her mission, and help us bear witness to the Christian faith in words accompanied by deeds.

Confirmation, like Baptism, imprints a spiritual mark or indelible character on the Christian’s soul; for this reason one can receive this sacrament only once in one’s life.

In the Latin Church this sacrament is administered when the age of reason has been reached, and its celebration is ordinarily reserved to the bishop, thus signifying that this sacrament strengthens the ecclesial bond.

A candidate for Confirmation who has attained the age of reason must

  • profess the faith
  • be in the state of grace
  • have the intention of receiving the sacrament
  • be prepared to assume the role of disciple and witness to Christ, both within the ecclesial community and in temporal affairs.

The essential rite of Confirmation is anointing the forehead of the baptized with sacred chrism, together with the laying on of the minister’s hand and the words: “Accipe signaculum doni Spiritus Sancti” (Be sealed with the Gift of the Holy Spirit.) in the Roman rite.

When Confirmation is celebrated separately from Baptism, its connection with Baptism is expressed, among other ways, by the renewal of baptismal promises. The celebration of Confirmation during the Eucharist helps underline the unity of the sacraments of Christian initiation.

From YOUCAT (Youth Catechism of the Catholic Church)

#205 – What happens in Confirmation?

To be confirmed means to make a “covenant” with God. The confirmed says, “Yes, I believe in you, my God’ give me your Holy Spirit, so that I might belong entirely to you and never be separated from you and may witness to you throughout my whole life, body and soul, in my words and deeds, on good days and bad.” And God says, “Yes, I believe in you, too, my child—and I will give you my Spirit, my very self. I will belong entirely to you. I will never separate myself from you, in this life or eternally in the next. I will be in your body and your soul, in your words and deeds. Even if you forget me, I will still be there—on good days and bad.”

0 Comments

You May Also Like…

2021 25th Sunday OT Year B

2021 25th Sunday OT Year B

Make a Morning Offering  taken from Dr Gregory Bottaro weekly email This week (if you don’t already), commit to...

2021 24th Sunday OT Year B

2021 24th Sunday OT Year B

Bible and the Virgin Mary Are you looking to deepen your love for the Blessed Virgin Mary?  Do you want to grow in...

Creeds: Summary of the faith

Creeds: Summary of the faith

From its earliest days, the Church used brief summaries to describe an outline of its most essential beliefs. These...

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This